Visualising Hull’s Beverley Gate- Part 1

Beverley Gate (Hull), 3D work in progress by Hannah Rice
Beverley Gate (Hull), 3D work in progress by Hannah Rice

With Hull’s UK City of Culture celebrations nearing in 2017 I thought it would be fitting to digitally recreate one of the city’s most historic landmarks- Beverley Gate.

Beverley Gate Remains
Beverley Gate Remains in 2010 (Photo by Chris Coulson, Creative Commons Atribution-Share Alike 3.0 )

At present, the gate’s structural remains can be seen at the west end of Whitefriargate, Hull. For years the remains have been a much overlooked heritage asset, however thanks to a public opinion campaign and talks of regeneration the structural remains are now a designated National Monument (see Beverley Gate listing on Historic England) .

Beverley Gate has a fascinating story and is one of high historical significance. On the 23rd April 1642, the gate was the location where Hull’s Governor, John Hotham, and his son (also named John Hotham) refused Charles I entry into the city- as a result being one of the catalystic moments of the English Civil War (and the subsequent executions of the Hotham father and son). It is a well-known story and gives the site national importance.

Using Blender, my latest visualisation of Beverley Gate will be based on both artist impressions, archival and secondary source material, held at the Hull History Centre, Hull Museums and the East Riding Archives. I’m aiming to digitally model the gate as it was in 1642- this means it will be a complete architectural structure and not the romanticised version which you can see in George Arnald’s lovely painting “Charles I Demanding Entrance at the Beverley Gate, Hull“, c1819- though I’d love to model this version too!

So far I have modelled the main gate structure, drawbridge and surrounding landscape. The next step will be texturing, finishing touches and hopefully being able to upload the model onto my Sketchfab account- more posts to follow!


New models uploaded to Sketchfab

Archives in 3D Workshop

For those interested in learning (from scratch!) how to 3D model historical buildings from architectural plans:



Level Up! MSc Done!

Its been awhile since I last posted and logged in (sorry for late comment replies!), I had to concentrate on completing my dissertation, which FINALLY has been handed in!

My topic was “Exploring the Pedagogical Possibilities of Applying Gaming Theory and Technologies to Historic Architectural Visualisation”. My main case study was my St Mary’s Abbey model which I’ve been blogging about on here for a while now. In my first part of my dissertation I looked at the theory of place, authenticity, “edutainment”, narrative and gamification with regards to pedagogical methods and how this is utilised by museums, Serious Games and commercial games with an architectural history focus. In the second part I used all of the theory I discussed in part one to propose an educational game (planned as a first-person RPG) based on my model of St Mary’s Abbey. I may decide to upload this paper once I’ve officially graduated (July)…if you’re into computer games and heritage you may enjoy it!

Now I’ve finished my MSc I’ve been thinking about where to head next… I’ve been working on my own website, built from scratch (thanks to my web dev module at uni, and my partner Si Stamp for helping me with the PHP! ). The address is and on here I’ll upload my 3D work. Now university is over I will be looking out for projects to work on and promote on my website. I’ll also be transferring this blog across at some point, and possibly adding a shop section. I will also start doing more game reviews- particularly on the topics of environments, architecture and history, and how they are portrayed in games.

I really enjoyed my time at the University of York. My thanks in particular go out to Sara Perry for her informative lectures on Cultural Heritage Management and support, and Anthony Masinton for his knowledge on gaming and historic visualisation, and also introducing me to Blender!

From my MSc I’ve learned how to create a website from scratch (that fully validates with W3C!), developed my database design skills, discovered new 3D modelling software that I am now obsessed with, learned how to survey historic buildings and also increased my knowledge in the management of cultural heritage. I would really recommend studying at York (I was there for 5 years!) if you’re wanting to study anything historical. Having experienced studying both in the History of Art and Archaeology departments, the staff really are the specialists in their fields, and the campus is also a nice, green space (full of ducks!).