3D model: Bull Sand Fort c.1940

Bull Sand Fort is one of my personal favourite architectural gems (which is unusual as I have a leaning towards gothic architecture) and it has a very evocative and mysterious presence in the Humber Estuary. It sits on a sand bank near Spurn Point (see my 3D model of the lighthouse) and the smaller island fort of Haile Sand.

WIP of Bull Sand Fort by Hannah Rice
WIP of Bull Sand Fort

Bull Sand Fort was built during the First World War to protect the ports located further up the estuary and was officially completed in December 1919.

Both of the forts were often under attack from aircraft and submarines. As of 1987 the fort was given Grade II listed status.

This artistic representation of the fort depicts as it was during the period of the Second World War, with the enhanced gun emplacements at roof level.

The fort contained accommodation for a garrison of 200 including sleeping quarters, stores for beer and coal, a kitchen and boiler rooms.

Although not necessarily true to life of the real Humber Estuary, I modelled the water with some level of translucency so the submerged features of the fort can be seen. The structure was modelled using photographs as a reference and the creation of texture UV maps in Adobe Photoshop. Original plans of the fort dating from 1917 can be consulted in the East Riding Archives, archive reference DDX1200/3/2 and are really interesting historical documents.

For a more in-depth history of this fascinating structure please see this informative account from the Island of Hope website.

Bull Sand Fort 3D model by Hannah Rice
Bull Sand Fort render by Hannah Rice
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3D Model: Spurn Lighthouse

This lighthouse located at Spurn Point (East Riding of Yorkshire) was built in c.1895 using the designs of Cornish engineer Thomas Matthews. It stands 39m high and is made of brick and rests on concrete foundations. The lighthouse is currently one of two at the site,

The lighthouse is currently one of two at the site, however, there have been several previous lighthouses, with the first one being built c.1427. The light was discontinued in 1985 and underwent restoration in 2015.

Spurn point lifeboat men's houses foundations near to the two lighthouses
Location of the lifeboat men’s houses. You can still see the brickwork sitting in the ground. Photos by Hannah Rice.

The inspiration to recreate Spurn Point’s current high lighthouse came from my own ancestral tourism trip where I was researching the once-home of my 3xgreat-grandparents.

My 3xgreat-grandfather, William Bacchus, and his wife Sarah Ann (3xgreat-grandmother) used to live on Spurn Point itself whilst he was a lifeboat man from 1877-1891 (with a two-year break from 1883-1885). During this time, my 2xgreat-grandmother Lavinia was born in 1879, along with sister Sarah Jane in 1882, and they lived in the lifeboat men’s houses overlooking the two older lighthouses.

Spurn Lighthouse 3D model by Hannah Rice. Wireframe to Textured blend.
Spurn Lighthouse by Hannah Rice. Wireframe to Textured blend.

3D Model: Thompson’s Folly, Cottingham

“Thompson’s Folly” was built in 1825 by Thomas Thompson within the grounds of his grand castellated house, Cottingham Castle near Hull. Built as a prospect tower, it stands on the highest point of the estate which at present is the grounds of Castle Hill Hospital.

Cottingham Castle was left as a derelict site after Thompson’s death in 1828 and a subsequent fire in May 1861. The folly is in the octagonal tower form featuring neo-gothic windows and is two-storeys tall. The style highly resembles Cottingham Castle itself- perhaps another future project!

 

3D Model: Bridlington Cemetery Chapel

I’ve been wanting to create a model of this Gothic-revival building for years and finally got around to create one based on my own photographs. Bridlington Cemetery Chapel (as mentioned in one of my old posts) is a Grade II listed building located in Bridlington’s main cemetery off Sewerby Road.

Bridlington Cemetery Chapel 3D model Hannah Rice
Model by Hannah Rice

The architect is Alfred Smith of Nottingham and on the front pediment is the date 1879 carved in the stone. It is a beautiful, symmetrical structure in the Victorian Gothic style that has an imposing presence over the cemetery. At the rear, some of the windows are unfortunately boarded up (as of April 2017 when I photographed the building), and so within my model I have replicated the decorated tracery that you can see on the front wings as this would have been the most likely scheme.

Bridlington Cemetery Chapel 3D model by Hannah Rice
Model by Hannah Rice

I particularly like the symmetrical nature of the structure with the arcades and central tower. For a potential future development, I may consider modelling some of the chapel’s surrounding graveyard to include some foliage and gravestones. This cemetery includes some lovely sculptural headstones which would be a particular challenge to model, but would really place this building within its wider context. This model of Bridlington Cemetery Chapel is a personal project and was created using my own photographs and Blender3D software.

3D Printing a ‘Pilgrim Rabbit’

Pilgrim Rabbit photo by Hannah Rice
Pilgrim Rabbit corbel carving at St Mary’s Church, Beverley. Photo by Hannah Rice.

Last Christmas, myself and Si decided to purchase a 3D printer- it is definitely worth it if you have ever considered bringing your digital models to life as tangible objects. The first thing I wanted to print was my Pilgrim Rabbit, a medieval, architectural carving from St Mary’s Church in Beverley which I photographed and created a model using photogrammetric techniques. The print took 4 hours and works by layering PLA filament through a nozzle- it’s amazing to watch the process and there will be more to come!

Here is a quick video of the 3D printing process for my Pilgrim Rabbit:

Pilgrim Rabbit, Beverley, 3D print by Hannah Rice

The North Bar, Beverley in 3D

The North Bar (Beverley, East Riding of Yorkshire, UK) is a Grade 1 listed, medieval gatehouse or “Bar”. The Bar was constructed in 1409 from locally sourced red brick and features ribbed vaulting and a buttressed façade. The north façade features the coat of arms of the Warton family.

The buildings adjoining the North Bar are intentionally left untextured to distinguish the medieval gatehouse from its surroundings, including the Bar House (17th-century) on the right-hand side of the North view (the default view for this model) . This model was created using polygon modelling in Blender.

3D Model: 17th-Century Gatehouse, Burton Agnes

The stately home of Burton Agnes Hall and its grounds are one of the favourite places from my childhood, particularly with myself having ancestors from the village, Burton Agnes. The gatehouse is particularly striking as a work of architecture so I had a go at interpreting my own photographs of the gatehouse to create a 3D model in Blender.

Burton Agnes Gatehouse by Hannah Rice
Untextured model. Copyright: Hannah Rice

The building was constructed in c.1610 by the English architect Robert Smythson, well known for his work during the Elizabethan era such as Hardwick Hall and Wollaton Hall. It features many architectural forms which are typical of this period, including the battlements and ogee-shaped roofing. Have a look at Historic England’s entry in the National Heritage List for England for this gatehouse.

I intentionally omitted the walls which extend from the gatehouse as I wanted to focus on the gatehouse structure itself, and similarly I also removed visitor signage. The model did not take as long to model as expected due to the symmetrical nature of the architecture-the mirror modifier tool was very useful!

Quad view of Burton Agnes gatehouse by Hannah Rice
Quad View of the gatehouse. Copyright: Hannah Rice